Operating Systems Domains

OS Networks part 1

Networks part 1

Domain 4.0 Networks This domain requires knowledge of network capabilities of Windows and how to connect to networks on the client side, including what the Internet is about, its capabilities, basic concepts relating to Internet access and generic procedures for system setup. The scope of this topic is only what is needed on the desktop side to connect to a network.

4.1 Identify the networking capabilities of Windows including procedures for connecting to the network.

Protocols

The following protocols are included with Windows 98

TCP/IP
IPX/SPX compatible
NetBEUI
32-bit DLC (The DLC protocol is primarily used for, accessing IBM mainframes, and Printing to Hewlett-Packard printers connected directly to the network)
IPCONFIG.EXE
Command-line utility that displays IP address and other configuration information.

WINIPCFG.EXE

The IP Configuration utility Winipcfg is a troubleshooting utility that displays all current TCP/IP network configuration values for any computer running Microsoft TCP/IP. Network configuration values include the current IP address allocated to the computer and other useful data about the TCP/IP allocation.

To run Winipcfg, select Run from the Start menu, type winipcfg, and click OK.

The resulting screen identifies your IP address and the IP address of your default gateway. If you Click More info. It will tell you your IP address, subnet mask, and default gateway for each of your network interfaces. It also shows your DNS and WINS settings.

Sharing disk drives

To Share a over a network drive, print and file sharing must be enabled

Right click my computer
Select properties
Click sharing tab, and select shared as
Sharing print and file services
Windows 95/98

Requirements for File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks

You must use Client for Microsoft Networks.
File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks cannot run at the same time as NCP-based File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks.
In order to use user-level security, a Windows NT domain controller must be used for authentication.
To install file and printer sharing
In Control Panel, double-click the Network icon
In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, double-click Service, and then click Add.
If you are installing File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks, select File and printer sharing for Microsoft Networks, and then click OK.
If you are installing File and Printer Sharing for NetWare Networks, select File and printer sharing for NetWare Networks, and then click OK.
Network type and network card

Two Major network Types

Peer to Peer

In a peer to peer network also called Workgroups, there is no dedicated servers. All computers are equal and therefore known as peers. Normally each computer functions as both a client and a server. There are usually 10 or less computers on this type of network.

Server Based

In a network with more than 10 users a peer to peer network will probably not be adequate. Therefore most networks have dedicated servers, which are not used as clients or workstations.

Network Adapter Card

A network adapter (sometimes called a network interface card, or NIC) is a hardware card installed in a computer so it can communicate on a network. The network adapter provides one or more ports for the network cable to connect to, and it transmits and receives data onto the network cable.

Every networked computer must also have a network adapter driver, which controls the network adapter. Each network adapter driver is configured to run with a certain type of network adapter.

A networked computer must also have one or more protocol drivers (sometimes called a transport protocol or just a protocol). The protocol driver works between the upper-level network software and the network adapter to package data to be sent on the network.

In most cases, for two computers to communicate on a network, they must use identical protocols. Sometimes, a computer is configured to use multiple protocols. In this case, two computers need only one protocol in common to communicate. For example, a computer running File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks that uses both NetBEUI and TCP/IP can communicate with computers using only NetBEUI or only TCP/IP.

Windows 98 Setup automatically configures a computer to use protocols and drivers to match network components that are running when Setup is started.

Installing and Configuring browsers


Install a modem or a network adapter (if you have a direct network connection to the Internet).
You can use the Internet Connection Wizard to help you sign up with an ISP if you need to and configure your connection to the Internet. Or
Make sure TCP/IP and Dial-Up Networking are installed, and make sure TCP/IP is bound to the Microsoft Dial-Up adapter or a network adapter.
Define a Dial-Up Networking connection to an Internet Service Provider, and define IP address information for each connection, or for your network adapter, if required.
Run the preferred browser setup program
Configure OS for network connection

Windows 9x

Installing Networking Components

You should not add Plug and Play compatible network adapters manually. Instead, you should let Windows detect the network adapter. If the Select Device box prompts you to select a network adapter, click the Have Disk button and type in the location of your network adapter drivers.

To install a driver for a legacy network adapter after Windows is installed


In Control Panel, double-click Add New Hardware, and then run the Add New Hardware Wizard.
To install networking components after Windows is installed


In Control Panel, double-click Network, and then click the Configuration tab.
Click Add.
In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, double-click the type of component to install.
Client software for the types of networks the computer is connected to.
Adapter Installs drivers for the network adapters in the computer.
Protocol Installs network protocols and sets related options.
In the Select dialog box, select the name of the component manufacturer and the name of the specific component.
Click OK.
Setting Computer Names and Workgroups

Windows requires that you define a workgroup and computer name for each networked computer, independent of the type of networking software you use. You can also change the computer name or workgroup after Setup is complete.


In Control Panel, double-click Network, and then click the Identification tab.
Type the values for the computer identification settings:
Computer name must be unique on the network. It can be up to 15 characters long, with no blank spaces. The computer name can contain only alphanumeric characters, as well as the following special characters: ! @ # $ % ^ & ( ) - _ ' { } . ~
Workgroup name does not need to be unique, but it uses the same naming conventions as the computer name.
Computer Description

Windows 2000

To add a network component


Open Network and Dial-up Connections.
Right-click the connection to which you want to add a network component, and then click Properties. Do one of the following: If this is a local area connection, click Install. If this is a dial-up, VPN, or incoming connection, on the Networking tab, click Install.
In the Select Network Component Type dialog box, click either Client, Service, or Protocol, and then click Add.
Do one of the following: If you do not have an installation disk for the component, click the appropriate client, service, or protocol, and then click OK. If you have an installation disk for the component, click the appropriate client, service, or protocol, click Have Disk, insert the installation disk into the selected drive, and then click OK.


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